Dear Change Leader, Change Yourself.

by blogadmin 3. June 2019 02:37

  

 Rhoda Kreuzer | Leadership In Action | Leadership Edition 

Why is change so difficult at work? Often, it's because leadership uses a logical approach to deal with the implementation of a new process, but ignores the emotional side of the equation. Put yourself in your others' desk chairs when it comes to change:

(1) It is unknown. We can't be sure if the change will be positive or if it will work.

(2) It requires us to change our pattern of behavior. Most people enjoy a routine pattern or a way of doing things. Change disrupts our routine. 

(3) It requires energy. Most of us would rather continue our current practice because it takes less work. We prefer autopilot mode.

(4) I am losing something of value. Most of us feel that with change we lose something important. Something we value about our status, our work, our relationships. We may even feel that we are out of control. 

You may think the ability to empathize and fully understand what's going on in a team member's head is easy, but today's leaders need to be REAL change leaders. Draw people into the story by making them active participants. The trick is to uitilize your soft skills and address the real concern of what's in it for them. Great change leaders make people see the positive side of change, show them how they will learn, grow, and improve, and make the status quo seem unappealing.

Personal Challenge:
With upcoming changes that need to be made, what can you do to improve your own soft skills? In what ways can you involve your team in the change process? How can you include them in the journey? Where can you demonstrate your enthusiasm and gratitude for their roles in making your company thrive and become even more successful?

Here's wishing you great success in all that you do! 

Who Loves Taco Bell? Here's WHY.

by blogadmin 20. May 2019 03:35

  

Rhoda Kreuzer | Leadership In Action | Building Healthy Teams Edition  

Do you want your team to work together? To pull in the same direction? Then you must tell them WHY it matters.

Leaders often believe that they have communicated effectively by providing instructions on what to do, issuing a due date, etc. This is nothing more than giving your team members data. What engages people is giving them understanding on the importance of the work they are doing and WHY it matters. When people are aligned and engaged in their work, they produce and strive for excellence.

This works effectively for Taco Bell. Greg Creed, CEO, firmly agrees "Getting alignment is very important, and how I gain it is by doing 3 things: You tell people what, you tell people how, but must importantly, and it's not something we're particularly good at is you have to tell them WHY...

(1) Telling them what, engages their heads.

(2) Telling them how engages their hands.

(3) Telling them WHY engages their HEARTS and enables you to make an emotional connection. This gets you the best alignment."

Click here to view a one minute video on the explanation of Simon Sinek's Golden Circle to understand more about how to craft and share your WHY. 

The Art of Reading An Interview Candidate

by blogadmin 14. May 2019 04:55

Carol Helsel | Leadership In Action | May 15, 2019 

One of the most important skills of an interviewer is the ability to read (or interpret verbal and non-verbal cues) a candidate you're interviewing. The key is to remain objective and not distort information because of preconceptions. Judith Orloff MD, psychiatrist and author, shares 3 techniques that can help:

1. Observe Body Cues.

-Pay attention to appearance. Are they dressed for success?

-Notice posture. Do they portray confidence? Arrogance? Signs of low self-esteem?

-Watch for physical movements such as nervous habits, distance, what they do with their hands.

-Interprent facial expressions. Do they look worried, bitter, happy?

2. Listen to You Intuition.

This is simply your gut feel. Honor these feelings.

3. Sense Emotional Energy.

The vibe we give off is usually registered with intuition. Some candidates emit positive energy, while others may be off-putting. Ask yourself how you feel being around this person.

With practice, you can ignite your senses and excel at identifying and selecting the candidate who will fit best!

 

Post by Carol Helsel, Senior HR Consultant, for Partners In Action, Inc. 

 

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