It's Okay To Hire From Competitors

by blogadmin 27. February 2019 02:03

  

Carol Helsel | Leadership In Action | February 27, 2019

Recruiting from a competitor or similar employer has several advantages. The position you're recruiting for calls for certain experience and knowledge and a person who already works in your industry likely has the attributes you're looking for. Your current employees may already know the candidate and can have a perspective on their fit with your organizational culture. The candidate may be known in your industry and have connections that are important in your company.

Although some may consider recruiting from competitors unethical, in reality what you're actually doing is prospecting candidates from a logical hiring source who may be looking for their next career move. If they're happy with their current job, they'll tell you and you can move on to other candidates. If they are ready to make a change, you may have an opportunity to hire someone who already understands your customers and your industry.

When hiring from competitors, there are a few things to be aware of. Employees may have signed a non-compete clause, which are legally-binding contracts that prevent employees form taking a position with a similar company for a certain period of time after resigning. Consult with legal counsel if you decide to proceed.

Legalese aside, you shouldn't strive to hire candidates strictly so they can tell you what your competitors are up to. You should ask them to join your team because you're impressed with their skillset and professional background and believe they'll be a talented addition to your team.

When you're looking to fill an opening, recruiting from competitors can be another strategy that might help you find your next great employee! 

HIRING: What's Your Batting Average?

by blogadmin 28. June 2018 03:02

Carol Helsel | HR Edition | June 28, 2018

"By and large, executives make poor promotion and staffing decisions," Peter Drucker observed. "By all accounts, their batting average is not better than .333:  At most, one-third of such decisions turn out right; one-third are minimally effective; and one-third are outright failures. In no other area of management would we put up with such miserable performance." Yet some companies seem to identify and attract great people consistently. What sets them apart?

To answer this question, the Drucker Institute solicited tips from top leaders across all sectors that have met two criteria: (1) They have outstanding records of performance and are (2) well-regarded by their employees as good places to work (according to Glass Door and other job-rating sites). Here's what these organization's executives have to say about making smart people decisions:

Mayo Clinic: Forget the 90-day intro period. Because it's not just a skill, but a culture fit, a set time period doesn't work for everyone.

Netflix: Don't start with the job description. It's almost never accurate and can lead to filtering out great candidates just because they lack certain credentials in the formal posting. Instead, figure out what you are trying to accomplish and what a great team would look like to get you there.

Genentech: Look for candidates who are articulate about what they still need to learn and how they'd like to grow. Also, don't shy away from bringing in employees who are making a career change. People with diverse experiences and perspectives will make an organization better.

Fort Collins, CO: Use multi-phase interviews to ensure success. First on the phone, then in person. They must pass the muster with interview panelists, other agency staffers, and an industrial psychologist for executives to ferret out undetected complications.

Nestle Purina:  Assess the mind frame of candidates AND question your own company's frame of mind as well. 

Communities In Schools:  Seek one job quality that stands out-resilience. Look for people who can be or get back-up after they've been knocked down and they learn something valuable from the experience. 

Challenge:

What one-third makes up your organization's batting average? Which of the company tips above have you not considered and why? What tips or practices can you put in place today to build a great team and knock the ball out of the park?

 All the Best,

Carol 

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