Do Your Employees Feel What They Do Matters?

by blogadmin 8. April 2019 02:59

Increases in technology and employee management strategies have driven home an important point: EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT is important to business success, but yet woefully ignored. Gallup reports only 15 percent of employees worldwide are engaged in their jobs. A bit of good news is that American workers are twice as likely to be engaged, but even so, that leaves 70% of employees who are disengaged at work.

The cost of disengaged employees to US businesses is a staggering $350 billion per year. To put that in perspective, for every unegaged employee on staff you business will lose $2,246 per year. Disengaged employees take more sick days, miss deadlines, cause customer complaints, and complain. Turnover rates are higher when employee engagement is low, morale is low, and engaged employees find it difficult to work to their full potential.

Here are 5 trends that Human Resources Today expects to see gain traction in 2019:

(1) Do you provide purpose? It's often overlooked, but employees need to feel what they do matters. Not only millenials, but the iGeneration want their work to have purpose. Capitalize on this by ensuring employees understand company values, and how their tasks-big or small-affect company success. Recognition is closely related to feelings of purpose and boosts employee engagement.

(2) Do you focus on employee experience? Employee experience relates to everything the employee does or feels on the job. Technology, corporate culture, workspace, and support systems all factor in to employee experience. Companies who cultivate employee experience have 4 times the average profits of their nonexperiential peers and see 40 percent less turnover. By treating each employee as customers, you ensure a better experience from the bottom up.

(3) Do you adopt professional development into your employment strategies? Technology is evolving at an ever-faster rate. AI, automation, augmented reality, and software advances are all changing the job market, leaving employees concerned their skills will quickly become obsolete. Deloitte Insights reports traning and development rank as the number one job driver for employees under the age of 25 and number two for up to age 35.

(4) Do you provide performance feedback quickly to your employees? Traditional performance reviews were a trial for managers and a major stressor for employees. Today, the use of real-time feedback tools is key. Employees value feedback as it helps them perform better and improves their standing in the workplace. Effective performance managment helps employees align their personal goals with larger organizational goals, helping both employees and the company develop and grow.

(5) Do you commit to diversity and inclusion? Employees feel psychologically safe knowing their company is committed to fairness and equity. Companies who rely on diverse and inclusive work teams are more engaged, creative, and innovative. 

Personal Challenge:

Do your employees show up physically, emotionally, and cognitively every day? Are they enthusiastic about what they do and why they do it? Do they naturally find ways to excel and do you support them? Which of these questions have you answered yes? How about sometimes? How about no? Start with the no's and the maybe's this week. Outline a few initiatives and get engaged!

Have a great week! 

S.T.R.I.D.E. Action Planning Tool

by blogadmin 8. August 2018 04:34

If You Don't Help Me Grow, I May Look For Another Job.

by blogadmin 30. May 2018 02:02

Many employers thought that once the recession was over, the practice of hiring and retaining employees would return to post-recession norms. Though, this has not been the case. Surveys have shown that employees throughout North America feel they are working in a high stress environment and if there was not a fear of "not finding something better", more employees would be leaving their jobs.

This has happened because companies are not working to develop their current talent. Employees are feeling overworked, unhappy, and underappreciated in their current fields. To mitigate your turnover rates there are 3 things you can change:

(1) Conduct a talent audit. It is vital to get a clear picture of more than job role, salary, performance reviews, and hire dates. Companies need to evaluate their staff to identify unique or highly specialized skills and competencies, job history, potential successors, a career path, aspirations, certifications, rewards and compensation plan. Gathering this information can provide valuable insight into actions needed to promote retention and engagement.

(2) Engage and retain your current team. Research has proven that engagement comes from the employee's relationship with their peers and supervisors along with opportunities to develop master. Employers should be creating the right conditions for employee self-direction.

(3) Lastly, optimize your sourcing, recruiting, onboarding and training programs. An employer must know their employees. This begins by optimizing the hiring process and identifying the employee's risks and rewards. by profiling skills, competencies, behaviors, and jog history of top performers, employees can identify what an ideal candidate looks like. The use of technology can simplify any business' talent intelligence. Understanding what the company has to offer and having the data to back it up will prevent dysfunctional turnover, unnecessary spending, and undesired suffering. 

Wilkins, D. (2013 January). What You Need To Know About Post-Recession Talent Management. Workspan, 33-37. 

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