If You Don't Help Me Grow, I May Look For Another Job.

by blogadmin 30. May 2018 02:02

Many employers thought that once the recession was over, the practice of hiring and retaining employees would return to post-recession norms. Though, this has not been the case. Surveys have shown that employees throughout North America feel they are working in a high stress environment and if there was not a fear of "not finding something better", more employees would be leaving their jobs.

This has happened because companies are not working to develop their current talent. Employees are feeling overworked, unhappy, and underappreciated in their current fields. To mitigate your turnover rates there are 3 things you can change:

(1) Conduct a talent audit. It is vital to get a clear picture of more than job role, salary, performance reviews, and hire dates. Companies need to evaluate their staff to identify unique or highly specialized skills and competencies, job history, potential successors, a career path, aspirations, certifications, rewards and compensation plan. Gathering this information can provide valuable insight into actions needed to promote retention and engagement.

(2) Engage and retain your current team. Research has proven that engagement comes from the employee's relationship with their peers and supervisors along with opportunities to develop master. Employers should be creating the right conditions for employee self-direction.

(3) Lastly, optimize your sourcing, recruiting, onboarding and training programs. An employer must know their employees. This begins by optimizing the hiring process and identifying the employee's risks and rewards. by profiling skills, competencies, behaviors, and jog history of top performers, employees can identify what an ideal candidate looks like. The use of technology can simplify any business' talent intelligence. Understanding what the company has to offer and having the data to back it up will prevent dysfunctional turnover, unnecessary spending, and undesired suffering. 

Wilkins, D. (2013 January). What You Need To Know About Post-Recession Talent Management. Workspan, 33-37. 

How Ideal Am I?

by blogadmin 16. May 2018 04:55

Rhoda Kreuzer | Leadership & Team Building | May 21, 2018

Everytime I hear the word "ideal", I tend to try and picture myself as the "ideal" mother, consultant, neighbor, or person. However, it doesn't take too long before I realize that "ideal" does not always match with reality.

When applied to being an Ideal Team Player or Leader, author Patrick Lencioni assigns three key attributes. Being Humble, Hungry, and Smart makes one ideal according to Lencioni.

Humble is defined as having an accurate self-view. Not thinking too highly of ourselves or lacking confidence in our abilities. Hungry is defined as want to make an impact, reaching goals, or striving to succeed. Smart is defined as our EQ - our awareness of how we impact others, of how others will react, of how to form strong relationships. Click HERE to learn how to spot ideal team players.

Challenge:

Each of these three characteristics is equally important to be an ideal team player or leader. So, which of these do you struggle with the most? How can you improve in that area to become a stronger team player or leader? Set a goal and  begin now to work towards the person everyone wants leading or on their team! 

All the best,

Rhoda 

Fake Stories.

by blogadmin 11. May 2018 04:18

Rhoda Kreuzer | Team Building Edition

Stories are wonderful things. They take us on journeys, allow us to imagine diverse cultures, and entertain us. They can create emotions of joy, thoughtfulness, or sometimes sadness. Stories have been used for centuries to convey truths being passed on from generation to generation.

However, there are stories that we create and believe every day without consciously being aware of them. Stories we create about other team members. For example, when someone fails to say good morning to us, we might create a story in our mind about how they have never liked us and are purposely snubbing us.

Or consider when someone makes a decision we disagree with and we create a story about them that assumes they are being uncaring or manipulative. These stories are powerful and begin to create a context for how we view that person and everything they do.

If we do not ask the person for clarification, we can end up making assumptions that are not true. This produces a lot of conflict within our teams. Instead, try asking yourself questions like, "I wonder why they chose to do it that way?" or " I wonder why they seem so quiet this morning?" Then ask the person for further input. You might be amazed to learn that your "story" or assumptions were "fake" all along!

Challenge:

-Starting this week, improve your personal relationship by asking questions first rather than making assumptions.

-Help your team improve their awareness in conflict situations. Watch this intro video on Everything DiSC Productive Conflict Assessment. Contact me if this tool might be for your organization.

Have a terrific week, 

Rhoda 

 

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