When A Client Insists You Have The Paperwork.

by blogadmin 8. January 2019 01:32

                                 John Karle | Sales Edition | January 8, 2018

Have you ever had a client tell you they completed the form and submitted it online, but you're unable to find it? Perhaps it's "lost in your email". This can often make for an uncomfortable situation.

How do you tell your client that you don't have the documentation when they insist they sent it in? I like to refer to two simple words, "trust and verify"; and I use these words when addressing the situation.

"Joe, I believe you that you sent in the document. Thank you for completing that. Please allow me some time to verify that the document was received and processed properly."

This is a great way for you to maintain your relationship with your client and/or prospect.

 

the Power of a Handwritten Note

by blogadmin 10. December 2018 03:43

  

  John Karle | Sales Edition | December 10, 2018

When was the last time you received a handwritten note or card? How did you feel when you opened it? It can be powerful.

Think about it. There's something special about going through the daily pile of bills and junk mail to find a hand addressed envelope with your name on it. In a world of immediate gratification and instant communication through technology, a hand-written letter allows us to take pause and feel connected to a human.

Starting this month and monthly for the new year, I encourage you to sit down and handwrite a thank you message in a special occasion card or note card to your top clients. If you are not sure where to start, aim for at least 3 sentences. Start with a (1) greeting and thank you, (2) something personal or complimentary, (3) a sentence about your client's business or your relationship with them, and (4) your wish for their success.

Here is an example:

Dear Bob,

I want to take a moment and thank you for being a client of "X" company. I've enjoyed your creativity and quick thinking and getting to know you over the past year(s)! I appreciate the opportunity to work with you and the business you've given me. Wishing you continued success in the new year!

All the best,

John 

Why Gratitude Is So Revolutionary At Work

by blogadmin 20. November 2018 04:11

 PIA Team Team Building Edition | November 20, 2018

The practice of gratitude--and its close sibling, appreciation has started to infiltrate work places, from new software start-ups to older institutions like Campbell Soup, whose CEO wrote 30,000 thank you notes to his employees. Though research on gratitude has exploded over the past 2 decades, studies of gratitude at work are still somewhat limited; results so far link it to:

-positive emotions

-less stress 

-fewer health complaints

-a greater sense that we can achieve goals

-fewer sick days

-higher satisfaction with our jobs and coworkers

While expressing thanks to colleagues might feel awkward or even at odds with some workplace cultures, many organizations have been developing innovative ways to overcome those barriers. 

Gratitude is a "gateway drug" for Southwest Airlines where appreciation is a cornerstone of their culture. Southwest seems to understand what research has shown: that gratitude tends to emperge in workplaces with more "perceived organizational support". Employees believe that the company values their contributions and cares about their well-being. One way the company pays attention to their employees is to recognize the special events in their personal lives--from kids' graduations to marriages to family illnesses--and recognizing those with small gestures like flowers and cards. They genuinely want the best for their people.

Studies show grateful employees are more concerned about social responsibility. They perform more "organizational citizenship" behaviors: kind acts that aren't part of their job description, like welcoming new employees and filling in for coworkers. A warning, however, companies must be consistent, sincere and careful not to leave some employees out. Time is always a factor, too.

Gratitude Ideas:

-compile differing gratitude practices as not everyone wants to be appreciated the same way 

-start off meetings with expressing gratitude around the table

-put time weekly on your calendar to stop by an employee's desk to thank them 

-add appreciation celebrations to employee training days or retreats 

-recognize and/or celebrate birthdays and other special occasions

Personal Challenge:

Pick one of the ideas above or one of your own. Enlist others to help. Begin putting it in place by the end of 2018. Make 2019 a company year of gratitude and thanksgiving! 

HAPPY THANKSGIVING TO YOU AND YOUR FAMILIES!!!

All The Best,

The PIA Team 

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