the Power of a Handwritten Note

by blogadmin 10. December 2018 03:43

  

  John Karle | Sales Edition | December 10, 2018

When was the last time you received a handwritten note or card? How did you feel when you opened it? It can be powerful.

Think about it. There's something special about going through the daily pile of bills and junk mail to find a hand addressed envelope with your name on it. In a world of immediate gratification and instant communication through technology, a hand-written letter allows us to take pause and feel connected to a human.

Starting this month and monthly for the new year, I encourage you to sit down and handwrite a thank you message in a special occasion card or note card to your top clients. If you are not sure where to start, aim for at least 3 sentences. Start with a (1) greeting and thank you, (2) something personal or complimentary, (3) a sentence about your client's business or your relationship with them, and (4) your wish for their success.

Here is an example:

Dear Bob,

I want to take a moment and thank you for being a client of "X" company. I've enjoyed your creativity and quick thinking and getting to know you over the past year(s)! I appreciate the opportunity to work with you and the business you've given me. Wishing you continued success in the new year!

All the best,

John 

Asking The Right Questions

by blogadmin 13. November 2018 06:43

Rhoda Kreuzer | Leadership Edition | November 12, 2018

While many leaders are busy seeking answers, few are evaluating if they are asking the right questions. Gaining answers is easy, but if they are answers to the wrong questions, then the answers have little value.

Consider the following as an example of some questions that have limited value: "I wonder how much this will cost? How much time will it take?" While these are not necessarily bad questions, they are not the most important questions we should be asking.

Instead, consider the power of asking, "What is the most important thing that I can do that will change my business?"

The difference is one puts the "cost" of a change or a decision in context of the impact it will have on our business and team. The others simply point out obstacles. The reality is that anything that is truly important will have obstacles to implementing the change. That, however, should not stop us from doing what is important-instead it informs our strategy for implementation.

Personal Challenge:

Begin today to evaluate the questions you are posing to yourself and others. Make sure the best questions are being asked and achieving true success! 

All The Best,

Rhoda 

 

No Follow-Up? No Deal.

by blogadmin 15. August 2018 02:29

 

John Karle | Sales Edition | August 15, 2018

The sale starts with the initial contact. Did you make a good first impression? When does the sale end? Is it when you close the deal?

No, the sales process does not end when you close the deal as it should conclude with a follow-up.

I recently met with a contractor at my home. He was on time, came prepared, and answered all my questions satisfactorily. Then, that was it. No follow-up at all. It has been six months and I wonder if his quote is still good. 

It also makes me wonder, how many sales he would have completed if he would only follow up after the presentation? He might learn something if he had asked, "Did you like my presentation?  Did I decide to go ahead with the job? If you are not going with me, who did you go with? And most importantly, why? Was it the product, price, workmanship, word of mouth or another reason?

When you follow-up, ask questions. Ponder the answers. Why wasn't I selected? What should I have done differently to earn the business? Why was my competitor selected instead?

A few follow-up questions will give you great insight and take your business to the next level! 

Personal Challenge:

-What organizational method would help you to schedule follow-up calls?

-What is a set of standard follow-up questions that you could ask your clients that would give you the best insight? 

All The Best,

John 

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