Why We Love Goals (You Should, too!)

by blogadmin 8. March 2018 02:34

Sales Edition | John Karle

A professional salesperson has established goals that stretch a person! Goals are developed planning and execution.

If you focus on the details each day and work on your plan, you will avoid panic. If you look through the lens of your goals, you should see yourself as a salesperson achieving your goals - personally and professionally with a well-laid out plan for each week, day, and month. This is accomplished by writing your goals down and holding yourself accountable by reviewing your goals regularly.

Application:

A young man I was working with wanted to take his family to Florida for spring break. He did not know how he could afford such a trip. At the beginning of the year, he wrote down his personal goal along with this professional goals for growth - a plan for monthly sales production. He reached his goal early by hard work and holding himself accountable. The trip was a wonderful reward for his tenacity.

Challenge:

Start today by writing down your GOALS and working on them DAILY. 

 

 

Are You Fighting Fires or Tending To Your Garden?

by blogadmin 10. November 2017 02:23

How many disasters have you dealt with this week? How many relationships had to be rescued? Who had to redo their work, explain numbers, or cut corners?

Leaders and professionals, ask yourself this: Are you nearing or at a point where firefighting is standard operating procedure? If so, things were not done right the first time around. Too often, businesses get stuck in the vicious cycle of rework, shortcuts, and lengthened deadlines. This puts them at risk for stressed-out employees, customer problems, a damaged brand, and ethics issues. How then do we change our leadership and working style from the on-edge firefighter to that of the happy gardener?
 
The happy gardener has done his or her best to nurture their plants the minute the seed was placed in the ground. Careful watering, weeding, pruning, and cultivating leads to fruit, flowers, and a lush garden. In the same way, high producing and results oriented employees thrive when nurtured by great leaders and fellow team members. Just as in a seed, there is great potential inside of everyone, and great leaders help bring it out in 4 ways according to Terry Lee: training, connecting, challenging, and coaching.
 
1. TRAINING
 Great leaders know that effective training is how to marry existing knowledge with the strategy of a company. Working with team members to identify what training is going to position them to be most successful now and in the future is crucial. Prior to training, leaders should sit down with team members to discuss goals, expectations, and takeaways from the training. Upon finishing, leaders should again meet with team members to implement action planning while the information is still fresh. Post training meetings turn ideas into action.
 
2.  CONNECTING
Helping team members connect the dots in another action of great leaders. Help others to understand why each area or department is extremely important to the mission of the company. Great leaders understand the whole mission and are adept at articulating that message in a consistent, authentic, and relative manner. 
 
3.  CHALLENGING
Extrinsic motivation - public praise, more money, and prizes aren't enough to motivate team members. Intrinsic motivation - purpose, autonomy, and mastery are just as important. Mastery implies the opportunity to really get good at something. In order to be really good at something, you must be presented with challenges that excite you to find the solution. And, solutions satisfy purpose.
 
4.  COACHING
When faced with challenges, it's good to have a good "guide on the side" to help you through. Great leaders, helpful colleagues, and insightful coaches meet you where are. They help you identify what options you may have to reach goals and then sets appropriate challenges to lead you to that success.
 
So, to help your company sustain focus and build for the long-term, the firefighting leader, instead of being an impulsive judge, will become more like a gardener, counseling, guiding, and connecting with team members on a day-to-day basis, learning from them and with them.
 
Personal Application:
-Have you defined clearly to your team members what you are promising to deliver to your customers, so they know what they should strive to deliver?
-How often do you come up with poorly thought out quick fixes that consume time, leave less time for core work, and cause confusion about expectations?
-What steps can you take today to train, guide, and nurture rather than judge, add checkpoints, or escalate issues?

Hey Leaders! Do You Really Want More Power?

by blogadmin 2. November 2017 04:46

Have you met that rising leader or team member that is always right? Or one that drains the energy from the meeting? Research shows that increasing personal power actually begins to interfere with our ability to empathize. Berkely social psychology professor Dacher Keltner found that subjects under the influence of power became more impulsive, less risk-aware, and crucially, less adept at seeing things from other people's point of view. 

In fact, power can actually change how the brain functions according to Canadian neuroscience researcher Sukhvinder Obhi. His study finds power primes our brain to screen out peripheral information. How does it happen?

Slowly and then suddenly. It happens with bad little choices, making isolated decisions and then throwing one's weight around shows up. Demands for special treatment might be the big finish. We've all heard about leaders who've been pulled over and become indignant yelling, "Do you know who I am?!" They reach a point where their power was once helpful to others has turned to power motivated by self-interest.

What can leaders do to keep their power in check? They must invite others in and ask for feedback from a wide variety of people. Don't be afraid to ask employees and colleagues the tough questions. Start with these:

-Are you keeping the small, inconvenient promises that fall outside of the spotlight?

-Do you keep people around you that help you stay down to earth? 

-Are you the same person at home, work and in the spotlight? 

-Do you get defensive when an employee or team member offers you a suggestion? 

-Do you isolate yourself in the decision-making process? 

-Do your decisions reflect your values? 

-Do you admit your mistakes?

-Do you demand special privileges?

 Lastly, a good executive coach or mentor can help you keep or return to the state of empathy and value-driven decisions. 

 

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